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How do we make decisions?

Life is like poker. We make many decisions with incomplete data. How can we make better decisions? We have to focus on the process.

Mapping uncertainty means developing your constraints first. Knowing your constraints will allow you to make better choices.

Dr. Robert Cialdini wrote a book, “Persuasion in the Modern World.” He is Regents’ Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Marketing at Arizona State University. Dr. Cialdini received his PhD from University of North Carolina and post doctoral training from Columbia University. He holds honorary doctoral degrees (Doctor Honoris Causa) from Georgetown University, University of Social Sciences and Humanities in Wroclaw, Poland and University of Basil in Switzerland. …


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If we could only ask the bees and Leonardo da Vinci!

Pollinating insects have a very obvious relationship with plants — they visit a brightly beautiful colored flower to obtain food (nectar) and in exchange they pick up pollen and carry it into neighboring flowers, pollinating them in the process. It’s a mutually beneficial relationship of food for flying sexual favors. One can reasonably imagine how such a relationship might have evolved over millions of years, with plants competing against each other using flower color, shape and scent to attract the most insects and increase seed production.

Flowers have been an important indicator throughout human evolution of our most important resource — food — either immediate, nearby or pending. Hand in hand with bees, our ancestors would have been part of the process of flower and plant evolution — consuming seeds and helping to spread them far and wide while the pollinators buzzed around doing their job high up in the canopies. …


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An organization is only as good as its culture — and building that culture is not only a role for HR, it’s every manager’s and employee’s responsibility. You can help make your organization a more supportive and engaging place to work by understanding the perceptual, institutional, and psychological processes that impact the ways people interact with each other.

Cultural competence refers to an ability to interact effectively with people of different cultures and socio-economic backgrounds, particularly in the context of human resources, non-profit organizations, and government agencies whose employees work with persons from different cultural/ethnic backgrounds.

Cultural competence comprises four…


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16,000 — that’s how many words we speak, on average, each day. Imagine how many unspoken words cross through our minds each day. Most of them are not facts, but perceptions and judgements intermingled with emotions. As we can relate, some positive and helpful;, and then the ones well…we know what they are.

There is a prevailing wisdom that leaders should project themselves in a particular way…stoic or cheerful… confident with a magic unicorn power to detox all negativity. This definitely goes against our basic biology. All healthy human beings have an inner system of thoughts and feelings that do not support prevailing wisdom. Whether we like it or not, this includes having an inner stream of criticism, doubt and fear. Our normal human response is to anticipate and solve problems in order to avoid any aversion along the way. …


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A special guest of this event was 96-year-old Dr. Wanda Półtawska, who testified as a young girl scout from Lublin on her experience in the Ravensbrück camp. She was in the first group of women subjected to pseudo-medical experiments. She said that for years she had fought for the knowledge of these crimes to see the light of day. She discussed how all doctors should know the history of Ravensbrück because it is a history of doctors’ disgrace.

“When learning medicine, they should know what they are allowed and what they are not allowed to.” This was a strong message she presented to the audience. She called for students to be taught not only knowledge, but also ethos. She sensitized the participating medics to always take the side of life. She postulated that future doctors from all over the world should familiarize themselves with the dark history of medicine in German Nazi concentration camps during their studies. …


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I’m sure we all have a few we can think of. How do we deal with toxic behavior? How do they know how to get under our skin so perfectly? Well, there’s a way for them not to! The main thing to keep in mind is they only do if we allow them to. Easier said than done! We’ve all been there before. Everyone has different tolerance levels, but when tensions hit the fan, it can get quite ugly, right?

Imagine being a mediator for Trump and Biden. How do two very different people and personalities come to some kind of consensus? How do leaders like these provide any hope when all we recently see is chaos, manipulation and misinformation? …


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How do you get your workforce ready for the next five years?

Tradition — the handing down of information, beliefs, or customs from one generation to another. Classroom training may be the traditional approach, and it may have been effective for quite some time, but as we see, things are changing and they are changing at an extremely fast pace!

Today, development shouldn’t be restricted to traditional formal instruction and classroom delivery. It should be ingrained into employees’ workflows, presenting opportunities to learn and grow across a number of touch points and mediums.

One of the most effective ways to make development a part of every employee’s “everyday” is through online and digital platforms. Using online management systems allows your work environment to provide employees with the opportunity to learn on the job, at their convenience, and with little to no obstacles. Time is a depleted resource and therefore flexibility and finding outlets that allow employees to pause and focus are integral. …


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How can we apply game theory in today’s society, workplace or even in our everyday lives?

An idea, program, project or initiative begins positively, with an initial burst of energy, excitement and enthusiasm. Business leaders, change managers, communication teams, and change champions, are excited and invigorated to propel the organization towards a transformative goal. However, when this initial burst dies down, people and systems return to business as usual — often reverting to old behaviors, and the transformation initiative runs the risk of extreme failure.

Design thinkers are encouraged to build what Roger L. Martin called “knowledge systems” by exposing themselves to a variety of stimulus — not only to learn, but to make connections, inspire, and apply. This is important because it sets the conditions for innovation. Steven Johnson’s Where Good Ideas Come From specifically calls out exaptation (taking inspiration from one area and applying it to another) and collision (magic that comes from bringing different perspectives/expertise together), perfectly summing it up with “chance favors the connected mind.” This becomes second nature with practice. With a bunch of small antennae constantly pinging, we find ourselves synthesizing new bits of knowledge all the time. …


Delicious Polish Fruit Cake (Ciasto z Owocami)
“chia-stow zzzz Oh-voh-tsah-me”

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Are you looking for a tasty recipe that is not too sweet, light and absolutely delicious? If you’re a foodie, you’ll definitely LOVE this traditional Polish fruit cake. You can make it your own and use whatever fruits you wish.

It’s perfectly soft, not too dry or moist. Best part — it’s super easy to make! This is a cake my family truly enjoys during any season. We bake it in the morning and it’s ready early afternoon. Typically, the entire cake is gone by evening!

Here’s what you need and steps on how to make it are below:

Ingredients

3 cups…


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Turn-of-the-century faith in ventilation to combat disease pushed engineers to design steam heating systems that still overheat apartments today.

The coronavirus pandemic has revived interest in the role design plays fighting infectious diseases. Most famously, the trailblazing modern architecture of the early 20th century — open to nature and filled with light and air. These are all ideas centered about health and wellness, especially in combating the scourge of tuberculosis (which also influenced bathroom design). The modern radiator was invented to fight epidemics like 1918′s Spanish Influenza, heating housing without sharing airflow.

The radiator is one of the greatest inventions of modern times. Can you imagine how miserable and cold life would be without central heating? Not to mention the smog we’d be coughing in caused by the increasing population burning more and more coal and wood on their fire. It turns out that the prodigious output of steam-heated buildings is the direct result of theories of infection control that were enlisted in the battle against the great global pandemic of 1918 and 1919. …

About

Basia Skudrzyk, MBA

Unlocking the potential of those who advance in the world. Mother. Executive Coach. Wellness, Education & Marketing Thought Leader.

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